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What are the types of medical tourism in India?

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Risks Medical Tourism India

Trying a change of scenery for better health is often an advice tossed to people with chronic health ailments.  True in an entirely different way, international patients take this advice for its merit and visit India for affordable and highly personalized healthcare. The expertise and repute of Indian doctors in their respective field is well established amongst the international patients that come from developed and developing nations alike.

Medical Tourism in India

Medical tourism is growing in India at a steady rate.  It is anticipated that Medical tourism in India will grow from its current size of $3 billion to $ 7-8 billion by 2020,” figures stated by India’s Economic Times.

Healthcare in developed Nations is far expensive in case of patients who have chronic ailments and make multiple visits to hospitals.  Expensive and complex surgeries like heart or kidney transplant draw many medical tourists to Indian shores every year who return to their countries satisfied with their professionalism and friendly attitude of the care giving staff.

Indian medicine like Ayurveda, Naturopathy and traditional treatment with herbs constitute a substantial part of the patient inflow as these practices are not accessible in other countries.

U.S tops the list for annual patient visits for care like cardiac bypass surgery, knee replacement, cataract and cosmetic procedures like facelift.  India is fast becoming a hub for dental care as well.

Why India is the best choice for medical tourism

  • Some of the reasons commonly stated by tourists from other countries are
  • Reduced cost of treatment
  • International Quality standards
  • Better availability of specialist doctors for transplant surgeries
  • Modern Infrastructure
  • State-of-the-art treatment facilities and diagnostic instruments
  • Expertise of doctors in their super speciality fields
  • Trained and compatible staff for international patient care
  • Visa on arrival scheme for tourists from selected countries
  • Favourable Health covers for international patients
  • Remote patient follow up & assistance

A visit that is more than just treatment

Patients coming to India often seek more than treatment and learn wellness techniques like Yoga, Ayurveda and Naturopathy. Many facilities in India have become a destination for learning and healing together. One can opt for a complete body detox using Yoga techniques and learn them too.

While these treatments are not available in foreign countries, it becomes an opportunity for international patients to extend their stay to learn and get certified in Yoga and Ayurvedic techniques for personal well being or starting a teaching school in their own country.

Centres like Patanjali in Haridwar and Varanasi, Astang Yoga Ashrams in Mysore and Shirodhara oil massage schools in Kerala are in close vicinity of urban cities with international airports.

Many tourists extend their stay and enjoy the Indian scenery by travelling to these places to celebrate their health and add a touch of tourism to their trip.

Conclusion

There are many more micro factors that attract medical tourists such as the relative ease in getting a donor for heart, kidney or liver transplant and commercial surrogacy being legal in India. Commercial surrogacy is very well established marked with surrogate mothers receiving medical cover, care and nutrition as covered by the foreign patients.

It’s tough to say if Medical tourism will touch the $8 million projection by 2020, but the increase in numbers will guarantee India a stronghold in International healthcare market thanks to the Best hospitals in India.